COVID-19 Response Hub

Information

These are the most common points of entry for home break-ins:

  • Front door: 34% of burglars twist the doorknob and walk right in.
  • First-floor window: 23% use a first-floor open window to break into your home.
  • Back door: 22% come in through the back door.
  • Garage doors: 9% gain entrance through the garage.
  • Basement: 4% choose the basement as a point of entry.
  • Unlocked areas, sheds, and storage: 6% will simply try for any opening that isn’t locked down.
  • Second-floor window: a daring 2% will go for the second-story window.

Sex Offenders have always lived in our communities, but it was not until the passage of the registration law in 1997 that law enforcement was authorized to notify the public of a sex offender’s whereabouts. Furnishing the public with information regarding convicted sex offenders is a critical step towards encouraging the public to develop constructive plans to prepare themselves and their families. Additional information about ways to reinforce personal protection is available in online publications and on the Department of Corrections Victim website. Go to https://appsdoc.wi.gov/public

    • Rear-wheel skid: If your back wheels are the ones that have gone out on you, gently turn your wheel in the direction you are sliding while taking your foot off the accelerator – but do not brake.
    • Front-wheel skid: If your front wheels begin to slide, take your foot off the accelerator and allow the vehicle to slow. After a few seconds, if you still don’t have control of your vehicle, lightly press the brake (we’re talking one toe, here).

Generally, under Wisconsin law, juveniles commit delinquent acts, not crimes. Criminal complaints (criminal charges) are not brought in the juvenile system. Rather, a delinquency petition is filed alleging the crime. Likewise, young adults who are found guilty are not “convicted” in juvenile court; they are adjudicated delinquent. Rather than facing the potential for jail time, they face the potential for juvenile detention. Additionally, in juvenile court, there is no right to bail, nor is there a right to trial by jury.

The Police Department wants to get you connected with your own “personal Police officer” so that you can ask questions and learn more about what happens in Bayside and at the Police Department. The Village is divided into eight sectors, each with its own myBlue Sector Officer. To view where you live and who you personal police officer is, click here: https://www.baysidewi.gov/myblue/

Frequently, both landlords and tenants have questions regarding their rights and responsibilities. More information may be found in the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade, and Consumer Protection’s Landlord/Tenant Guide.

Requests for copies of police reports, accident reports, or other police records are made directly to the Police Department by filling out a Public Open Records Request form and submitting it to the Police Department. The form is available online or can be completed in-person at the Police Department.

Once received, the form is reviewed by a Police Department Lieutenant who is specifically trained in Wisconsin Open Records Law. We will notify you if the record can be released, and when it will be available. There is a nominal fee for copies of documents.

You must make the request in person or send a notarized request to the Police Department. The Bayside Police Department is only able to provide a background report on activity that occurred in Bayside. If you would like a background report for activity out of Bayside, go to the Wisconsin Online Record Check System at https://recordcheck.doj.wi.gov/.

Services

Yes, but only from April 15 to October 31, AND it must actually be used, not just stored. Also, snowmobile trailers can be kept on residential property from November 1 to April 15. It also must be used during the season, not just stored.

Open storage of trailers other than trailers used with a recreational vehicle or snowmobile and which are in use during all periods of the year may only be permitted with the approval of the Village.

The Village ordinance is very specific. No car or vehicle shall park on the street at any time without first obtaining permission from the Police Department. The Police Department may, in its sole discretion, withdraw such permission upon 30 minutes advanced notice to the person who originally obtained permission for street or alley parking, or one-hour advanced notice to the owner of the vehicle. Signs advising of the prohibition of parking on Village streets are posted at entrances to the Village.

To obtain permission, please call 414-351-9900. For large numbers of cars, please register your request online. 

If you lock yourself out of your car or home, call 414-351-9900. A Bayside Police Officer will come to your location and assist you. If a child is in the car, call 911.

Prescriptions can be dropped off at the Police Department lobby and into the prescription drug drop box. The Department does not accept any illegal drugs or sharps.

On-street parking is not allowed in the Village. If you need to park your vehicle on the street overnight or for an extended period of time, please contact our Police Department at 414-206-3916.

Schedule a vacation check by calling 414-206-3916 or make a request through Access Bayside.

On-street parking is not allowed in the Village. However, if you are hosting a party or event at your home, please advise your guests to park on the same side of the street as your home and inform the Police Department by calling (414) 206-3916. “No parking” signs can be put up for a fee of $25. The signs will be placed on the opposite side of the street from your home.

Did You Know?

As part of Bayside’s policy, officers sometimes must perform what is called a “silent run”. During this time, officers will have their emergency lights on without the audible cue of a siren. This is particularly useful when responding to calls in which the officer’s presence being known could conflict with victim safety or evidence preservation. Bayside’s most common uses for “silent runs” include bank hold-up alarms and home invasion alarms. While engaging in a “silent run”, officers are allowed to travel faster than posted speed limits but are still expected to drive with due regard for public safety and follow all other traffic prompts. 

Wisconsin doesn’t actually have a specific statute regarding citizen’s arrests, but such arrests are covered by common law or judge-made law. Those laws allow citizens to make arrests under one of two conditions. The first is when a citizen has probable cause to believe that the person they are arresting has committed a felony. The second is when someone witnesses a misdemeanor and the misdemeanor is a breach of the peace. Generally, we don’t advise making citizen’s arrests. We do advise calling police and staying on the scene if it’s safe, but safety is paramount. If someone is wielding a knife or attacking someone, he or she may just as easily attack you. Some exceptions apply, particularly when the perpetrator is going to flee. For example, if you see a child being kidnapped and can block the kidnapper’s car from getting away with the child, it may be worth the risk. In addition to safety concerns, you also face legal risks when making a citizen’s arrest. The Fourth Amendment restricts unreasonable searches and seizures, and you could be prosecuted for depriving someone of their constitutional rights. You could also face a civil lawsuit for false imprisonment, assault, or battery.

Yes, the police officers understand that drivers are skeptical of vehicles that do not have regular police markings and emergency lighting on the roof. Police officers expect drivers to travel to a well-lit and even populated location before stopping, such as a fast food restaurant or gas station. Police officers also understand if drivers are reluctant to roll their window down fully or leave their vehicle until it has been established that the driver is indeed being stopped by a legitimate police officer.

Wisconsin State Law permits U-turns at controlled intersections unless signs are installed to indicate the maneuver is prohibited. U-turns will have to be made from the left-most turn lane in the same fashion as a conventional left turn. Vehicles on the intersecting street attempting to turn right on red must yield to the U-turning vehicle. Backing up is not allowed in a U-turn, so drivers will have to be familiar with their vehicle’s turning radius. U-turns will also be prohibited on curves and hill crests where visibility is less than 500 feet.

If you are driving a motor vehicle you must show your license to do so, as driving is a privilege instead of a right. If you receive a citation, you must provide the required information for the ticket. When being issued a citation, you are being released on your promise to appear in court or provide the appropriate bond before the appearance date. You must sign the citation promising to do so, it is not an admission of guilt.

To earn a probationary driver’s license as a teen, you must hold an instruction permit for at least 6 months. Within this time, you must fulfill the following requirements to qualify.

  • You must be at least 16 years old.
  • You must have an adult sponsor.
  • You must pass an approved drivers education course.
  • You must be free of any traffic violations for 6 months.
  • You must accumulate 30 hours of behind-the-wheel driving experience, with 10 of those hours being at night.
  • You must be enrolled in school or have graduated from high school.

Upon fulfilling all these requirements, you can then apply for a probationary license.

Close window